The Gold Rush (1925)

The Gold Rush - 1925

Director - Charles Chaplin

Starring - Charles Chaplin, Mack Swain, Tom Murray, and Georgia Hale

Charlie Chaplin's The Gold Rush is essentially the same film as Modern Times, the other of his films that I've seen.  That is not to say that it is bad, or that it is poorly done, on the contrary the gags are very well through out and expertly executed.  No, I only mean that The Gold Rush is a venue for Chaplin's most enduring character, The Tramp, to play out many of the same, or at the very least similar, gags as seen in his other films.  The backdrops in each changes, but he essence of each is the same.

This time around The Tramp is trying his luck in the Alaskan frontier as a gold prospector.  A number of other characters struggle alongside him, most notably is Georgia, the love interest.  He spends the entirety of the movie pining after Georgia, dreaming up clever ways to get her attention, and most of the time failing miserably.  There is some tension between the Tramp and some of his fellow prospectors, but it mostly amounts to a bunch of innocent, slapstick, sight gags.  At no point was I ever convinced that Chaplin was going to fail, or die, or succumb to any of the dangers to which he is subjected throughout the film.  Once all the danger and opportunity for our hero's failure is stripped away, all that is left are a series of nice, but rather shallow skits that are barely tied together by setting and characters.

The individual gags themselves (a delusional prospector sees the Tramp as a plump chicken, constant walking through doorways into empty space, and playing round-about games of hide and go seek from ones' pursuers, to name a few) have inspired more than a few Warner Brothers cartoons as well as defining the language of comedy.  The real accomplishment in what Chaplin managed with his films was in the imitation that he inspired.  His gags (and those of his contemporaries) have been used, re-used, and re-imagined so much that they have become a part of our collective knowledge.  The value of his work is measured in how many people know about it, whether or not they know it's Chaplin's work doesn't lessen the impact of its saturation.

Despite the fact that, in my opinion, The Gold Rush isn't the best of the movies on this list, I recognize it's importance.  If for no other reason than it's contribution to the language and history of film, The Gold Rush deserves to be on the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die.